Candy

Gouging for goodies has always been one of my least favorite parts of the movie-going experience. Concession prices at theatres are outlandish and that added cost sends many potential viewers right back to their own comfortable sofas and almost free popcorn.

Sometimes it’s good to know I’m not alone.

Michigan resident Joshua Thompson has filed a class action lawsuit against his local AMC theater because the movie house won’t let him bring in his own soda and candy. Food he’d want to eat if it were fairly priced.

According to the Detroit Free Press, Thompson was tired of movie theaters taking advantage of him. So he’s suing. Both AMC and the National Association of Theatre Owners declined to make any comments.

So how much do movie theaters really take home from their concessions? According to a Morningstar equity analyst, 85 cents of every dollar spent for candy and soda is pure profit. That little $10 candy bar is worth about a buck and a half, just what you’d expect to pay down the block.

Popcorn is even worse. $30 worth of raw popcorn brings in as much as $3,000 to the movie theaters. Selling nickel bags of majajuana on the street corner doesn’t even bring in that kind of profit.

Meanwhile, Hollywood is still wondering why theatre attendance is plunging at an ever-faster clip. It may have somehting to do with the egregious prices for a bit of sweetness.

Gouging for goodies has always been one of my least favorite parts of the movie-going experience. Concession prices at theatres are outlandish and that added cost sends many potential viewers right back to their own comfortable sofas and almost free popcorn.

Sometimes it’s good to know I’m not alone.

Michigan resident Joshua Thompson has filed a class action lawsuit against his local AMC theater because the movie house won’t let him bring in his own soda and candy. Food he’d want to eat if it were fairly priced.

According to the Detroit Free Press, Thompson was tired of movie theaters taking advantage of him. So he’s suing. Both AMC and the National Association of Theatre Owners declined to make any comments.

So how much do movie theaters really take home from their concessions? According to a Morningstar equity analyst, 85 cents of every dollar spent for candy and soda is pure profit. That little $10 candy bar is worth about a buck and a half, just what you’d expect to pay down the block.

Popcorn is even worse. $30 worth of raw popcorn brings in as much as $3,000 to the movie theaters. Selling nickel bags of majajuana on the street corner doesn’t even bring in that kind of profit.

Meanwhile, Hollywood is still wondering why theatre attendance is plunging at an ever-faster clip. It may have somehting to do with the egregious prices for a bit of sweetness.